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How to Choose the Best Paint Pens for Your Project

Historically, artists have always found a way to make use of different types of materials and figments. From various media through to the methods we use to create our vision – adapting to new creative techniques is half the fun of getting creative

Historically, artists have always found a way to make use of different types of materials and figments. From various media through to the methods we use to create our vision – adapting to new creative techniques is half the fun of getting creative.

If you’ve typically kept to one type of medium (e.g. crayons), opting to mix things up and try your hand at a new type can be a great way to upgrade your skillsets. Even as a hobbyist, exploring and experimenting is exactly what it means to dive into the world of art.

So, in this post, we’re running through why paint pens should be on your “to try” list, and how to choose the right ones for your project.

The different types of markers

To many, there’s only one type of marker, but if you’re a budding artist or professional, you’ll know the tiny differences between all the options on the market. Beyond this, you may be looking for something just to keep the kids entertained on a rainy Sunday afternoon.

No matter what your intentions are, each type of pen comes with its own textures, pros and cons, and it pays to know exactly what you can expect from your pick of the bunch.

Drawing markers

Used to help you make accurate outlines or to sketch neatly, drawing-based options typically offer a smooth finish. The inks don’t smudge (unless on a glossy surface) and commonly feature a point size of around 0.01 to 1.0.

The drawing pen is what you’ll find in a majority of grocery, book or office supplies stores. Why? Because you can also use them for anything beyond art.

Note: The bigger the tip, the higher the number.

Permanent markers

These are the ones you want to keep away from the kids. As a more absorbable media, these ones feature a much bigger tip and are used for thicker drawings or even when you need your handwriting to be seen (e.g. on poster paper or a whiteboard). Just like the nifty pen above, these options are used in a wide variety of contexts beyond art, simply because they’re able to mark any solid surface.

Dry erase markers

Think of these as the polar opposite to permanent markers. They have similar characteristics but they are erasable once they have dried. Typically not used to mark stuff, but rather for classroom contexts, they’re more kid-friendly and safer to use across the board.

Colouring markers

The crowd-favourite for kids and adults alike, these collections feature huge varieties of colours and palettes to choose from. It’s important to note, though, that these are not made for art-specific projects, so stray away from them if you’re completing something intricate. They’re basic, and offer all of the essentials you need for keeping the kids busy or doodling away but aren’t intended for professional contexts.

Need to stock up on some new supplies for your collection? Browse our range online now.

 

 

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